1 Year Anniversary

I’m generally not one for sentimentality, so it should come as no surprise to anyone that knows me that I allowed October to come and go without any ceremony.  I figured, though, that I should give some dignity to the fact that I have been blogging for over a year now. 

First, I’d like to say that it was primarily the ALT.NET conference in October of 2007 that motivated me to blog and the rest was history. Though there are so many individuals to thank, a few particularly stand out as primary catalysts:  Jeremy Miller, Scott Bellware, and David Laribee.  Thank you everyone who has participated in the community and commented and encouraged me and I hope I have been able to contribute back in kind to your blogs and the community in general.

Also, a very special thanks should go out to the folks at Los Techies who really helped me get going and hit a major stride in blogging. Not to mention providing an awesome atmosphere for exchanging, debating, and promoting ideas.

To commemorate this otherwise uninteresting event, I’d like to post some stats for anyone who cares about those sorts of things :)

Number of Posts

Old blog66 posts (October 2007 – January 2008)

Current Blog (Los Techies)94 posts (January 2008 – October 2008)

Total: 160 posts (October 2007 – October 2008)

Average Posts per Month: 13 posts 

Number of Comments

(note: I can’t seem to figure out a way to get total number of comments from Community Server, I’m working on it, sorry)

Number of Trackbacks

(note: I can’t seem to figure out a way to get total number of trackbacks from Community Server, I’m working on it, sorry)

Most Popular Posts (by Visits)

I don’t have exact figures on these, but from what I can tell from Feedburner, Community Server stats, Technorati, etc it appears that this is mostly correct:

  1. Using jQuery with ASP.NET MVC (December 2007)
  2. Pablo’s Topic of the Month – March: SOLID Principles (March 2008 – NOTE: I don’t take credit for this, since this was ALL of Los Techies that did this)
  3. Getting Started With jQuery for Client-Side Javascript Testing (August 2008)
  4. Testing ScottGu: Alternative View Engines with ASP.NET MVC (NVelocity) (November 2007)
  5. Using script.aculo.us with ASP.NET MVC (December 2007)

Most Popular Posts (by Comments)

I can’t seem to find a way to get Community Server to tell me this, so I’ll have to wing it, but I think this is mostly correct:

  1. 1 Common Mistake Involving Code Commenting (59 comments)
  2. Some Consulting Wisdom I Picked Up (45 comments)
  3. SQL is the Assembly Language of the Modern World (36 comments)
  4. Project Anti-Pattern: Many Projects in a Visual Studio Solution (35 comments)
  5. PTOM: The Liskov Substitution Principle (35 comments)

My Most Favorite Posts:

  1. Ancient wisdom is inescapable, especially with project management
  2. I don’t trust me
  3. Some Consulting Wisdom I Picked Up
  4. Time-to-Login-Screen, and the absolute basic requirements for good software
  5. 1 Common Mistake Involving Code Commenting

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About Chad Myers

Chad Myers is the Director of Development for Dovetail Software, in Austin, TX, where he leads a premiere software team building complex enterprise software products. Chad is a .NET software developer specializing in enterprise software designs and architectures. He has over 12 years of software development experience and a proven track record of Agile, test-driven project leadership using both Microsoft and open source tools. He is a community leader who speaks at the Austin .NET User's Group, the ADNUG Code Camp, and participates in various development communities and open source projects.
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  • Andrew

    Keep up the great work, Chad (and all of Los Techies). You guys have helped me immeasurably the last few months.

  • http://mikecox.com Mike Cox

    Keep up the good work, Chad. That’s world’s best blog.You really should be a ZDNET-blogger.

    Sincerely
    Mike Cox