Author Archives: Chris Patterson

About Chris Patterson

Chris is a senior architect for RelayHealth, the connectivity business of the nation's leading healthcare services company. There he is responsible for the architecture and development of applications and services that accelerate care delivery by connecting patients, providers, pharmacies, and financial institutions. Previously, he led the development of a new content delivery platform for TV Guide, enabling the launch of a new entertainment network seen on thousands of cable television systems. In his spare time, Chris is an active open-source developer and a primary contributor to MassTransit, a distributed application framework for .NET. In 2009, he was awarded the Most Valuable Professional award by Microsoft for his technical community contributions.

MassTransit Now Speaks XML By Default

Last night, I made a major update to the trunk of MassTransit that changes the default message format from binary to XML. Since the first drop of MassTransit, the default format for messages was binary. This had several advantages, one … Continue reading 

Posted in .net, masstransit, msmq | 4 Comments

MassTransit Saga Enhancements for Event Processing

In the past year, I’ve been learning about Event Driven Architecture and how using it in the enterprise can make adding functionality over time easier through a loosely-coupled event-based architecture. With Event Driven Architecture, business components can subscribe and react … Continue reading 

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I’m Down With M.V.C., Yeah You Know Me!

Over the past week, I’ve had some time to dig into the new ASP.NET MVC framework. For starters, my background in web development is mostly classic ASP talking to COM objects built in C++. I’ve only used ASP.NET to provide … Continue reading 

Posted in .net, altdotnet | 2 Comments

Declarative Workflow with MassTransit

One of the really cool features that is available in the 0.6 release of MassTransit is the ability to declaratively define a saga/workflow using a nested-closure syntax in combination with a fluent builder. While some wonder if fluent interfaces are … Continue reading 

Posted in .net | 3 Comments

MassTransit 0.6 Release Candidate

I’m proud to announce that we are getting close to a final 0.6 release of MassTransit. We’ve been working on this release since early December and have added a lot of new functionality. We’re also glad to have integrated a … Continue reading 

Posted in .net | 2 Comments

Dr. Dru and PhatBoyG On Elegant Code Cast

Just over a week ago, Dru Sellers and I recorded a podcast with Elegant Coders Jarod Ferguson and David Starr. We spent a couple of hours discussing event driven architecture (EDA), messaging, and MassTransit. Through the magic of editing, they … Continue reading 

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Developing for the iPhone

First, one my the reasons I love using OSX: 16 applications open including 4 Xcode projects, Photoshop, Numbers, Evernote, Mindjet MindManager, and more without a hint of slowdown and still 1.3 GB free (4GB total on my MBP). It’s wide, … Continue reading 

Posted in osx | 2 Comments

State Machine for Managing Sagas

MassTransit supports sagas, which are long-lived transactions consisting of multiple events. The saga support makes it easy to orchestrate the events into a process, but it doesn’t do much to help with state management. Since state management is fairly common, … Continue reading 

Posted in .net, masstransit | 6 Comments

MassTransit Turns One Year Old, Celebrations Held Around the World

Today marks the one year anniversary of the first commit to the MassTransit GoogleCode repository. While Dru Sellers and I initially did some proof of concept work, this day marks the decision to go forward with a standalone .NET messaging … Continue reading 

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Simplified MassTransit Configuration

One of the things I’ve missed since we integrated container support is the ability to quickly and easily create an instance of the ServiceBus. After Ayende agreed, I decided it was time to do something about it. Behold the minimum … Continue reading 

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment