CLOSED: Want To Work From Home, Doing .NET Development? Read This!

UPDATE: This job posting is closed. Thanks to everyone who read this and responded by submitting a resume! We had more tremendously talented applications for the position than we could handle. :)

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TrackAbout, Inc – the company that I’ve been employed with for the last 5 months – is hiring another .NET developer. We’re a passionate bunch of people – on the technology and business side of things – building high value, high quality software for an international customer base with deliveries to our production environments on a 2 week schedule.

You can read the official job post over at the joelonsoftware job site, which has instructions on how to apply for the job as well.

Here are some of the highlights of the job, in my opinion… note: this is my personal opinion and not part of the official company job ad:

  • 100% work from home. you know you want to.
  • Top-notch talented team, all with a passion for delivering high quality software and continuing to learn and improve
  • Work with some of the latest and greatest tools, technologies and processes in the .NET space
  • You can read about our communication tools and processes here
  • and did I mention 100% work from home? seriously… you know you want to.
    • spend more time with the family
    • wake up 1 minute before you start your work day and still be early
    • yell at the neighborhood kids “HEY! Get off my LAWN!” :)
  • and 100% work from home… i said that, right? no really… i know you want to…

Here’s some of the team / technology highlights from from the job ad:

All members of our development team are dedicated to keeping up with the latest technologies, practices, patterns and tools related to software development. We take time out to share our knowledge with one another and improve both our skills and our distributed development environment. We often experiment with and integrate new tools into our environment. Some of the tools and technologies we’re currently using include: ReSharper, Subversion and git, MassTransit, CruiseControl.NET, TDD with NUnit, FXCop, VersionOne, MediaWiki, RhinoMocks, Ninject, NHibernate and jQuery.

Well, what are you waiting for? Go read the job ad and apply already!


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About Derick Bailey

Derick Bailey is an entrepreneur, problem solver (and creator? :P ), software developer, screecaster, writer, blogger, speaker and technology leader in central Texas (north of Austin). He runs SignalLeaf.com - the amazingly awesome podcast audio hosting service that everyone should be using, and WatchMeCode.net where he throws down the JavaScript gauntlets to get you up to speed. He has been a professional software developer since the late 90's, and has been writing code since the late 80's. Find me on twitter: @derickbailey, @mutedsolutions, @backbonejsclass Find me on the web: SignalLeaf, WatchMeCode, Kendo UI blog, MarionetteJS, My Github profile, On Google+.
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  • mart

    Sorry, but I prefer working from office to working from home. Have done both and so working from home isn’t something dream alike.

  • http://kozmic.pl Krzysztof Kozmic

    @mart

    this is a matter of personal preference.

    I did occasionally work from home at my previous job and I absolutely loved it!

  • http://www.lostechies.com/members/derick.bailey/default.aspx derick.bailey

    working from home is not for everyone… i almost didn’t take this job, 5 months ago because my previous work from home experience was awful. i’m glad i took this job, though. this team knows how to do it right.

  • Sean

    I work from home now and personally I love (LOVE!!!) it. I am far more productive and have tons more time for the family. The key to working from home is you have to love what you do, and I love being a .Net developer.

    The only real downside to my current role is that my firm is not very cutting edge .Net wise. They are not even paper-cutting edge or light-scratch edge to be honest. Projects on the side keep that urge satisfied for the most part, but I wish it was more.

    I was uber-excited to see this post and that ad, right up until I saw that it was US only. I currently work for a US firm even though I live in Canada. Here’s hoping TrackAbout needs some good Canadian devs soon. That or I guess I could move to Hawaii and see if Rob will teach me to surf.

  • flynn like

    might want to mention that “We are not considering applicants outside the U.S.” everyone know there are no valid developers outside of the good ol’ usa that are capable of working from home…

  • flynn like

    and judging from the site, maybe a designer would be a better investment than a developer…

  • http://www.lostechies.com/members/derick.bailey/default.aspx derick.bailey

    yeah, i wish we could hire some non-U.S. people… so much talent outside of our borders that we can’t tap into.

  • Rob

    What are the benefits like there? The company site didn’t say anything about healthcare, 401K, etc.

  • http://sharpbites.blogspot.com alberto

    ugh, us-only…

  • Ben Hyrman

    To be fair, it’s likely US-only given the need to start figuring out labor laws, taxes, etc once you go outside your home country.

  • http://www.reddybrek.com Richard Reddy

    aaawwww US only [shniff]

    Don’t suppose you’d like to open an Irish office ;)

  • http://corp.trackabout.com Larry Silverman

    Hi, hiring manager, here. Sorry about the US-only restriction. We’re a small business, and dealing with international labor laws is too much overhead at this time.

    @flynn re: our site design – Ouch. Anything else you’d like to pick on us for? Did we run over your dog or something?

  • Steve

    I imagine Canadian’s who qualify for a TN visa wouldn’t be all that complicated from a US Labor Law standpoint…that being said, it does severely complicate things like health coverage, benefits, etc.

  • Liam

    How much does it pay? You say first.

  • Sean

    The visa process itself is pretty straight-forward if you are working in the US. I worked in Chicago for a few years on an H-1B visa. From what I recall from moving back to Canada though, the process gets messy quick if you are a non-US resident, working out of country but still for a US firm. Taxes, pensions and benefits are even messier.

    @Larry kudos for hoping on here and responding. Let me know if you ever expand to Canada!

  • Larry Silverman

    @Sean – We’ll keep you in mind! We’re hoping to be servicing some customers in Canada soon, and one of our technology partners, TECSYS, is based there.

  • http://togaroga.com Andrew Hare

    This sounds like a fantastic opportunity, I’m glad I submitted my resume! If anything I at least have a new dev blog for my Google reader!

  • http://travisquinn.blinkweb.com/1/2013/05/what-is-the-latest-in-the-net-development-environment--8ade9/ TravisQuinn

    I had spent lots of time to work on .Net development in house but cant make times to do it.but when i work on it my first work is to solved the bugs.