Austin Code Camp Sessions Voting Results

Keeping with total transparency in the way that we run the Austin Code Camp: below are the results for the voting for sessions.  The voting is used for the following purposes:

1. This allow speakers who submitted multiple sessions to decide to pull their least popular session.
2. This list allows us to properly schedule  sessions in the correctly sized room.  The St Edwards Professional Center has a large number of rooms of varying sizes so it is really important to make sure we arrange the schedule so that we can distribute the most popular sessions throughout the day. 

I though publishing this information publicly may be of interest to everyone in the .Net Community thinking it would be good to understand where the general interests in software development are.  I think it is pretty cool that they is a huge interest in patterns and practices. It is clear that developers want to do things the right way and are looking for clear direction on just how to implement these in real code.

Votes Title
58 Increasing Your Productivity with LINQ (2 hours)
54 Enterprise Architecture Patterns: Presentation, Business Logic, and Persistence (2 hours)
53 S.O.L.I.D. Software Development: Achieving Object Oriented Principles, One Step At A Time (2 hours)
49 Sneak peek at C# 4.0 (1 hour)
48 Building Business Applications with Silverlight 3.0 (2 hours)Building Business Applications with Silverlight 3.0 (2 hours)
45 Getting Started with LINQ and ADO.NET 3.0 (2 hours)
45 Practical Inversion Of Control (2 hours)
44 Advanced IoC Container Topics (2 hours)
44 ASP.NET MVC in Action (2 hours)
44 Project Automation – Learn about Build and Deployment Automation
43 Building your DAL (Data Access Layer) with the ADO.NET Entity Framework (2 hours)
42 Using Jquery (2 hours)
42 Designing views in ASP.NET MVC (1 hour)
41 Test Driven JavaScript
41 ASP.NET MVC: Red Pill or Blue Pill? (1 hour)
41 Big Picture Testing: Fluently specifying complex scenarios for integration tests. (1 hour)
39 Applying Refactoring techniques to prune the legacy code (2 hours)
38 A Handfull of Things You Can Do In Ruby That Scares the Pants Off of C# Developers (1 hour)
36 Git for people (1 hour)
34 Decoupling Workflow From Forms With An Application Controller And IoC Container (2 hours)
34 Intro to Scrumban (2 hours)
30 Developing Applications Using Data Services (1 hour)
28 SQL Server Reporting Services: Report Creation and Deployment (2 hours)
28 SQL Server Performance Monitoring & Optimization (2 hours)
25 Telecommuting: The Myths, The Truths, and The Lies (1 hour)
24 Make your Data Dance with ASP.NET Dynamic Data (1 hour)
23 SQL Server Basics for Non-DBAs (2 hours)
23 Adding to eCommerce to your ASP.NET site with PayPal (2 hours)
23 Put your MVC Views in Hyperdrive with T4 Templates
22 Take It For A Test-Drive (4 hours)
21 Asynchronous Job Processing Using Quartz.net (1 hour)
19 Search Enabling Applications with Lucene.NET (2 hours)
18 Introduction to Web testing with Watir and Ruby (2 hours)
18 Connecting Silverlight and .NET clients with Java, PHP and .NET services (2 hours)
15 Dealing with SharePoint Data (1 hour)
14 SnapDragon (1 hour)
13 SharePoint, ALM and Team Development (1 hour)
12 Getting Started with Virtual Worlds: Overview and Hands-On Lab (2 hours)
11 Introduction to FubuMVC (2 hours)

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About Eric Hexter

I am the CTO for QuarterSpot. I (co)Founded MvcContrib, Should, Solution Factory, and Pstrami open source projects. I have co-authored MVC 2 in Action, MVC3 in Action, and MVC 4 in Action. I co-founded online events like mvcConf, aspConf, and Community for MVC. I am also a Microsoft MVP in ASP.Net.
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  • http://www.lostechies.com/members/chadmyers/default.aspx chadmyers

    This is really great. If not entirely, it’s almost entirely practical stuff, and none of the fluff or “Intro” marketing-ware you normally get at Microsoft-related conferences. This gives me hope that the community is really taking charge and driving the discussion and Microsoft is helping facilitate, not dictate (which is the way things work best, IMHO)