Monthly Archives: April 2007

Swallowing exceptions is hazardous to your health

This post was originally published here. In my last entry, I set some guidelines for re-throwing exceptions.  The flip side from re-throwing exceptions is swallowing exceptions.  In nearly all cases I can think of, swallowing exceptions is a Very Bad … Continue reading 

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Re-throwing exceptions

This post was originally published here. If this hasn’t happened to you already, it will in the future.  And when it does, you’ll tear your hair out.  You’re reading a defect report, an error log, or a message in an … Continue reading 

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Notes on defects

This post was originally published here. Right now I’m working on defects for one version of a project, and soon to be starting development on the next version. Whenever I start work on defects, I always take a quick read … Continue reading 

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Feedback

This post was originally published here. I found a great list of items about feedback here. For a TFS version, substitute “Automaton” or “Orcas Beta 1″ for “Cruise Control”. Because our customer doesn’t know what he wants, he finds out … Continue reading 

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Classifying tests

This post was originally published here. When defining a testing strategy, it’s important to take a step back and look at what kinds of tests we would like to develop. Each type of test has a different scope and purpose, … Continue reading 

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Evils of duplication

This post was originally published here. Everyone is guilty of using “Ctrl-C, Ctrl-V” in code.  During development, we may see opportunities to duplicate code a dozen times a day.  We’re working on some class Foo that needs some behavior that is … Continue reading 

Posted in C#, Refactoring | Leave a comment

Example of creating scope with the using statement

This post was originally published here. The using statement is widely used for cleaning up resources, such as a database connection or file handle.  To use the using statement, the variable being scoped just needs to implement IDisposable.  There are … Continue reading 

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