Author Archives: Chris Patterson

About Chris Patterson

Chris is a senior architect for RelayHealth, the connectivity business of the nation's leading healthcare services company. There he is responsible for the architecture and development of applications and services that accelerate care delivery by connecting patients, providers, pharmacies, and financial institutions. Previously, he led the development of a new content delivery platform for TV Guide, enabling the launch of a new entertainment network seen on thousands of cable television systems. In his spare time, Chris is an active open-source developer and a primary contributor to MassTransit, a distributed application framework for .NET. In 2009, he was awarded the Most Valuable Professional award by Microsoft for his technical community contributions.

Rebooting Topshelf for Version 3

When we created Topshelf, one of the prime directives was ease of use. It had to be easy for the developer to add a reference and create a service. To keep it easy, we had another prime directive: the developer … Continue reading 

Posted in .net, topshelf | 3 Comments

Benchmarque – Comparative Benchmarking for .NET

Last night, I announced that the first release of my benchmarking library Benchmarque was available on NuGet. This morning, I’d like to share with you what the library is, and how it to use it. What is Benchmarque? Benchmarque (pronounced … Continue reading 

Posted in .net, c# | 5 Comments

MassTransit v2.5.3 Now Supports the TPL

As I’ve started to use MassTransit with SignalR, one of the things that annoyed me was the hoops I had to jump through to get a nice asynchronous request from SignalR into MassTransit. There was a lot of plumbing since … Continue reading 

Posted in masstransit, signalR | 2 Comments

Received my 4th Visual C# MVP Award!

I’m happy to announce that I have been awarded the 2012 Microsoft® MVP award for my technical contributions to the Visual C# community over the past year. This is the fourth consecutive year that I have received the award, and I … Continue reading 

Posted in .net | 4 Comments

Odoyule Rules Engine for .NET

So I’ve been writing a rules engine for .NET for many years (on and off, but mostly off unfortunately). Lately, I picked it up again and yesterday published an early version on NuGet (OdoyuleRules). The implementation at this point is … Continue reading 

Posted in .net | 8 Comments

References on the Actor Programming Model

The actor programming model is a software development method that encourages the decomposition of applications into autonomous components which are self-contained and operate asynchronously and independently from one another. This model is well aligned with the nondeterministic nature of distributed … Continue reading 

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

MassTransit v2.0.1 Available

At the end of October, we released MassTransit v2.0.1 to GitHub and NuGet. This release only included a few fixes that didn’t make it into the v2.0 release. Since I never made an official announcement of v2.0 on the blog, … Continue reading 

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Actor Model Programming in C#

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending Øredev in Malmö, Sweden. While at the conference, I presented two sessions — including a new talk on Actor Model Programming in C#. This was the first official presentation I’ve given on … Continue reading 

Posted in .net, c# | Tagged , | 4 Comments

MassTransit v2.0 Beta Available Now on NuGet!

After what seems like a long slumber, along with work being done on other projects such as Topshelf and Stact, it is our great pleasure to announce the first beta release of MassTransit v2.0. What originally started out as a … Continue reading 

Posted in c#, masstransit, msmq | 3 Comments

The Right Tool, The Right Time

Over the past few months I have been reviewing many of the products I was involved in creating, both as a developer and an architect, and have assembled an inventory of the technology and architecture used. With a catalog of products … Continue reading 

Posted in Development | 1 Comment