Docker and Swarm Mode – Part 2

In part 1 of this post series about Docker SwarmKit I showed how we can quickly create a cluster of nodes (VMs) using VirtualBox and configure a Docker Swarm on this nodes. I then showed how we can run a private registry in the swarm which contains the images we want to use. Finally I showed how the swarm masters behave if the leader node fails.

In this second part we want to deploy and run a complex, microservices based application in our swarm. Without further adue let’s dive into the topic.

If you are interested in more Docker and container related post written by me, then here is the link to an index of all post.

Key Concepts of a Swarm

Before we start with code I want to give a short explanation about some key concepts of a Docker swarm. It gives us the 30 thousand feet view and helps us to better understand how things relate to each other. But don’t worry, this post is not going to be a purely theoretical one, we will dive into concrete code samples further down.

Node

In my last post I showed how we can easily create 5 VMs using Virtualbox on our devleoper machine and configure them as nodes in a swarm. According to Docker

A node is an instance of Docker Engine participating in a swarm.

In a swarm we distinguish between manager and worker nodes.

Service

Starting with Docker v1.12 some new concepts were introduced. One of them is services. A service is the logical definition of a component running in a swarm. A service defines a set of tasks. Or expressed a bit differently, according to Docker

A service is the definition of the tasks to execute on the worker nodes. It is the central structure of the swarm system and the primary root of user interaction with the swarm.

OK, evidently a service is a very important concept in the context of a Docker swarm since it is the primary point of interaction for us with the swarm. We will see in detail further down what that means in reality.

Task

A task carries a Docker container and commands to run inside the container. It is the atomic scheduling unit of swarm.

A task in this sense is a unit of work. At this time a task always is associated with a container (instance). But conceptually that is not the only possibility. When Docker first introduced the SwarmKit at DockerCon 2016 in Seattle they also made it clear that a task can be associated with other types of unit of work, e.g. a VM.

Swarm

So, now that we have nodes and services we can define what a swarm is

A swarm is a cluster of Docker Engines (nodes) where you deploy services.

Any Docker Engine (node) can run in two modes, standard and Swarm mode. If the node participates in a swarm, then the Docker Engine runs in Swarm Mode.

When we run a Docker Engine outside of a swarm we execute container commands like docker build ... or docker run .... If the Docker Engine participates in a swarm then we orchestrate services; e.g. docker service [service-name] --replicas 3.

Application, Services and Networks

When we talk about an application we always have (at least) two view points. We talk about the logical and the physical view of the application or we can also say the logical and the physical architecture of the application. Let’s first talk about the logical view.

Logical View

In the context of Docker and Docker Swarm, an application is made up of 1 to many services running on 1 to multiple of software defined networks (SDN). Those services collaborate with each other by exchanging messages or calling each other in an RPC like style. Each service can be “attached” to one or many networks. The communication between the services happens over a network. In this regard a network can be regarded like a wire that connects services or maybe a channel through which the water (messages) flows from service to service. Only services that are attached (or have a connection to) the same network are able to communicate with each other. There is no way that two services can see each other or connect with each other if they are on different networks. Let’s illustrate this with an image. As always images say more than a thousand words

In the above image we have the application in orange which encompasses 3 services A, B and C (blue). In the application we also have 2 networks SDN-1 and SDN-2 defined (gray). Service A is connected to SDN-1, service B is connected to both, SDN-1 and SDN-2 whilst service C is connected to SDN-2. Thus service B can see A and C while services A and C cannot see or communicate with each other.

Physical View

In the logical view we wouldn’t care about nodes, tasks, containers or the swarm at all. In a physical view the latter enter the picture. We have a cluster of nodes, called a swarm onto which we want to deploy an application consisting of several services. For reasons like high availability we want to deploy more than one instance of each service in the cluster, such that if one service instance fails or crashes the application is continuing to work with the other remaining instances of the same service. We also want to make sure that the instances of an individual service get deployed to different nodes such as that if a whole node goes down our application can continue to work. When I talk about an instance of a service I really mean a task. Again, a picture can say more than a thousand words

In the above image we have a swarm consisting of 3 nodes. One node is a master and the other two are worker nodes. The application we have deployed consists of 2 services A and B and a database which is not part of the swarm (e.g. a SaaS solution like AWS RDS or Mongo Labs). Service A runs in two instances A1 and A2 on nodes node-1 and node-2 whilst service 3 runs in 3 instances, one on every node.

Creating Services

By default a task represents a container or instance of the service. The service thus is like a blueprint with information such as which image to use for a container, how many instances to run, etc. Docker swarm tries to always maintain the desired state of which services are the most important part. Thus if a service defines 3 instances but only 2 are currently running then the swarm manger tries to start a new instance to fulfill the desired state.

We saw in part 1 how to create a service when we created the private registry. Let’s try another sample and run 3 instances of Nginx in our swarm. The command for this is

docker service create --name Web --publish 80:80 --replicas=3 nginx:latest

We can now use the following command to list all instances of the service

docker service ps Web

and will see something similar to this

In the above list we can see that 3 instances are running. We can also see on which nodes of the swarm they are running as well as the Desired State and the Current State. At the time of the snapshot the Current State was in Preparing... mode. If we wait a few moments and try the command again we should see the Current State being Running.

Publishing Ports

Another interesting and important fact is that when we publish a port of a service, this port is published to all nodes of the swarm. That is, even if I have a single instance of the Web service running say on node1 I can reach this service from any node in the swarm on localhost:80. The swarm manager will automatically reroute my request to the correct node. We can test that by SSH-ing into a node other than the ones on which Nginx now runs (node1 and node4 in my case). There we can execute this command

curl localhost:80

And the response should be the HTML with the welcome message generated/served by Nginx.

Services and Desired State

If we have defined a service with a desired state of 3 replicas then the swarm manager will make sure that this state is always maintained even if a container goes away. In this case the manager will schedule a new instance of the service to a node with sufficient resources. Let’s try this and stop one of the Nginx containers. To do this I will open another terminal and SSH into node2 where one of my containers runs

docker-machine ssh node2

and now I can stop this container

docker kill [container ID]

note that I got the [container ID] by executing docker ps and identifying the ID of my Nginx container.

If in my session in node1 I now execute

docker service ps Web

again, then I should see something like this

which tells me that one instance (Web.1) has been lost on node2 and a new one has been created on node4 instead.

Scaling a Service

At any time I can scale an existing service up and down. Let’s scale our Nginx to 5 instances

docker service update Web --replicas 5

and after a few seconds I have 2 additional instances running. The same works of course to scale down. I can even scale down to zero instances

docker service update Web --replicas 0

this is the outcome (I remain with 5 shutdown instances)

Upgrading a service

Before we dive into this section let’s remove the previous service

docker service rm Web

Upgrading a running service is one of the most important and exciting features of a service. Specifically upgrading the version of the Docker image used by the service. Docker SwarmKit allows us to do a rolling upgrade such as that our services remain operational at all the time. Let’s do that with a sample. First we run a specific version of Nginx

docker service create --name nginx --publish 80:80 --replicas 3 nginx:1.10.1

then we upgrade the service to the newer version 1.11.3

docker service update nginx --image nginx:1.11.3

after a while we should see somthing similar to this

Please notice the timing in the column Current State above. We can see that the service was updated in a rolling fashion. One task or container after the other was upgraded. The scheduler waits until one instance is upgraded successfully until the it starts the upgrade of the next one. This guarantees that we do not have a service interruption ever.

Worst case scenario: the scheduler fails to upgrade a task. It will retry the upgrade over and over again until it succeeds. At this time there is no direct way to tell the scheduler to stop after x unsuccessful attempts. We have to go and explicitly stop the upgrade.

Running a Service globally

Another important feature is the possibility to declare a service as global which means that the swarm master schedules a task/container on each and every node of the swarm. This is very useful for such situations as running some containers like log collectors, etc. We will see a sample of this later when we discuss the use of the ELK stack and other logging providers.

Another sample where sometimes global services are used is for debugging purposes. We can schedule a lightweight container globally in sleep mode, e.g.

docker service create --name debug --mode global alpine sleep 1000000000

Here we use the alpine image since it is small. We use the --mode flag to declare the service as global. If we now do a

docker service ps debug

We’ll see that we have an instance running on every single node of our swarm. We can now SSH into any node and the exec into this debug container and use it for our debugging purposes; e.g. to test service discovery, etc.

Dealing with failing Nodes

If a node of our swarm fails the swarm manager automatically reschedules all tasks (or containers) that were running on that node to another node with free resources. To achieve this we can simply shutdown one of the nodes of our swarm which has some tasks running on it. We can then monitor one of the affected services and see how the task from the “failing” node is rescheduled onto a different node having free resources.

Note that if the failing node comes up again it stays empty. Tasks that were previously running on it are not automatically transferred back to the node.

Servicing Nodes

From time to time we might need to service the nodes of our swarm, e.g. to update the version of Docker Engine. To achieve this we can first drain a node. The swarm manger will then automatically stop all tasks instances on this node and reschedule them onto another node. Once the node is “empty” it is marked as inactive and can now be upgraded or serviced without compromising the services running in our swarm. We can achieve this using the following command

docker node update --availability drain

Removing Nodes from the Swarm

In part 1 we have seen how to join a new node to an existing swarm. Sometimes we want to remove a node from the swarm. This is easy. SSH into the node and execute this command

docker swarm leave

The above command will fail if the node is a master. In this case we have two options, we can

  • demote the node and then have it leave the swarm or
  • force it to leave with the --force flag

Note: If at a later stage the same node joins the swarm again it will have a different node ID.

Networks

As soon as we have to deal with multiple services running in a swarm we need to define (overlay) networks. To create a new network in our swarm we can use this command

docker network create [network name] --driver overlay

Here I have selected the overlay driver for our network which spans across multiple hosts. When we create a service we need to assign it to a network. A service can be attached to many different networks. Only services residing in the same network can communicate with each other and leverage service discovery as discussed in the next section.

Service Discovery and Load Balancing

The Docker Swarm provides us service discovery and load balancing. If an instance of service foo needs to access an instance of service bar running in the same network of our swarm then foo can use the name bar to identify and reach out to service bar. Let’s make a more specific sample. Let’s define the two services. First we create a network

docker network create test --driver overlay

then we create the service foo

docker service create --name foo --replicas 1 --network test nginx

and finally we create service bar

docker service create --name bar --replicas 3 --network test --publish 8000:8000 jwilder/whoami

Note how I use the image jwilder/whoami for service bar. A container of this image simply returns the information about on which node it is running (the hostname) back to the caller. It is an ideal image for this demonstration.

We can find out where our foo instance (Nginx) is running with

docker service ps foo

Once we have identified the node we can SSH into it. There we can exec into the nginx container

docker exec -it [container ID] /bin/bash

Once we’re inside the Nginx container we can install curl using this command

apt-get update && apt-get install -y curl

and then we can then use the name bar as the DNS name for the bar service in our curl command

curl bar:8000

If we do this multiple times then we can see that not only is service bar discovered for us but we are also load-balanced in a round robin fashion among the (3) instances of foo, as is evident in the below image

Note that if we scale bar up to say 5 instances, load balancing will automatically add the new instances to the round robin as soon as they are running.

Summary

In part 2 of this series I have introduced some of the new concepts that are new since Docker version 1.12. These are swarm mode, services and tasks. Services are a core concept of swarm mode and are the primary interaction point of us with the swarm. In a swarm we have master and worker nodes. Master nodes schedule services in our swarm and make sure that the desired state of the cluster is always maintained. The swarm also provides services like service discovery, rescheduling of containers from failing nodes and much more.

In the next part we will finally learn how to deploy our complex application into the swarm. Stay tuned.

About Gabriel Schenker

Gabriel N. Schenker started his career as a physicist. Following his passion and interest in stars and the universe he chose to write his Ph.D. thesis in astrophysics. Soon after this he dedicated all his time to his second passion, writing and architecting software. Gabriel has since been working for over 25 years as a consultant, software architect, trainer, and mentor mainly on the .NET platform. He is currently working as senior software architect at Alien Vault in Austin, Texas. Gabriel is passionate about software development and tries to make the life of developers easier by providing guidelines and frameworks to reduce friction in the software development process. Gabriel is married and father of four children and during his spare time likes hiking in the mountains, cooking and reading.
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  • Pierre-Jean

    Hi,

    Thanks for those nice blog posts.

    I followed this tutorial step by step but when I tried to create the first service with the command ‘docker service create –name Web –publish 80:80 nginx:latest’, I got only one instance of the service instead of 3 expected. I wonder if you miss the ‘–replicas 3′ argument to the command?!

    Also, for the rolling update, you used the command ‘docker service upgrade’ instead of ‘docker service update’.

    I look forward to reading the next parts.

    Pierre-Jean.

    • boy

      I agree with your comment, the replicas command was missed out, also to scale you can use ‘docker service scale Web=50′.

    • gabrielschenker

      Good catch, thanks. I updated the commands

  • deepu james

    this might be the best tutorial on docker 1.12. thanks for publishing this…

  • Khoi Thinh

    Hello, i have a question
    Is it possible to deploy WordPress site to multi-node in Swarm and if one of the nodes go down, other nodes still work so customer can access WP site as normal.
    Sorry i’m new to this.

    • gabrielschenker

      Technically yes, you could deploy a WordPress service and scale it to say 3 instances. Of course you need to use a real DB as backend, e.g. MySQL/MariaDB. But for details on how to scale out a WordPress application I am not an expert. Please refer to their documentation

  • Pep Pino

    Hi,

    I tried to run two services, they are in the same overlay network but I can’t use their service name to make them communicate each other. I can only use the container name, that is not really a good choice : ) Is there a way to debug this?

    Thanks :)

  • krsyoung

    Fantastic tutorial for getting a taste of Docker Swarm! Thanks for putting this together Gabriel. One small nit would be to specify that a node name is required for the drain command: “docker node update –availability drain [node name]“

  • Mursil Sayed

    You mentioned setting up docker-compose in part1 but I don’t see any usage of docker-compose. Docker swarm mode doesn’t have support for docker-compose. (deploy and stack are experimental features). Till the time docker swarm mode adds support for the docker-compose file for deploying service, I dont think it is ready for production deployment.

    • gabrielschenker

      Good observation. I sometimes use docker-compose in swarm mode to build the images. But I can also do that with the docker command directly.
      Docker is having this new deployment packages in experimental mode which will provide us the capability to deploy whole applications to a production swarm… so, no need for docker-compose :-)

      • Mursil Sayed

        with docker 1.12.1
        How can we pass environment variables to services?
        How can we mount persistent volumes with services?

        • gabrielschenker

          I’ll go into more of these kind of details in the next part of the series.

  • Can’t wait for part 3! Great tutorial so far!

  • Hi! Thanks so much for your posts on Swarm!

    I have a little issue with some of the examples, with containers exiting immediately after start. E.g. when I try to run the Service Discovery example, I get this:

    # docker service create –name foo –replicas 1 –network test nginx
    194bw6mbgwyhmyl82zcxbyzat

    # docker service create –name bar –replicas 3 –network test –publish 8000:8000 jwilder/whoami
    alhz41p6usu7pbyesiiqh2hrd

    # docker service ls
    ID NAME REPLICAS IMAGE COMMAND
    194bw6mbgwyh foo 0/1 nginx
    alhz41p6usu7 bar 0/3 jwilder/whoami

    # docker service ps foo
    ID NAME IMAGE NODE DESIRED STATE CURRENT STATE ERROR
    5vlgohetx4l95hm2mcggd4r6a foo.1 nginx docker-swarm-1 Running Running 5 seconds ago

    # docker service ps bar
    ID NAME IMAGE NODE DESIRED STATE CURRENT STATE ERROR
    f1w9dxlaqgjlscwkf6ocdrui9 bar.1 jwilder/whoami docker-swarm-2 Running Running 23 seconds ago
    7xg7p0rc8oerp0p6nvnm3l73i bar.2 jwilder/whoami docker-swarm-2 Running Running 24 seconds ago
    8m2ct4pcc8t263z1n4zmitn5y bar.3 jwilder/whoami docker-swarm-3 Running Running 25 seconds ago

    As a result,

    # docker exec -it 5vlgohetx4l95hm2mcggd4r6a /bin/bash
    Error response from daemon: No such container: 5vlgohetx4l95hm2mcggd4r6a

    What am I doing wrong?

    • to answer my own question, docker service ps does not give the ID I’m looking for. `docker ps` gives the right one

      • gabrielschenker

        happy that you figured it out on your own :-)